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OK. I'm new here, but I've got a quick question. I have two 1995 Seadoo Bombardier jet skis. One is out of commission right now (needs spark plugs and battery), but the other one was working fine on Labor day.

But I took it out earlier today, and it was running great for a while, full speed, full throttle, then it just quit on me, almost as though it was out of gas, even though I had just filled the tank.

This jet ski has a brand new battery, charged properly and all. The spark plugs were replaced a year ago, and don't show any signs of wear and tear yet.

There is no water coming in through the hull at all.

But I don't know why it's quitting on me. I've come to the conclusion that if I don't press on the throttle at all, it will stay on, even if I go at, lets say half-throttle, it'll coast... But anything on the upper end, it will rev up to that much power, then just die on me.

I suggested the problem to a friend, and he wasn't sure about his answer, but he mentioned that without the throttle handle pressed down, the jetski should remain in idle... And if that's true, then mine's messing up because without my hand pushing down the throttle, I'm still moving forward, just at "no wake" speed. He said that since I am moving forward instead of straight up idling, my idle is set too high... But I'm not sure if that's the case or not.

Could anyone please provide me some insight?

Thanks,

ZMD.
 

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Unless you have a "transmission" with forward, neutral, and reverse the jet ski should move forward at no wake speeds with no pressure on the throttle this is perfectly normal.

As far as your quitting issue. I'd start with a compression test to make sure engine is OK. Then move on to fuel or electrical. What kind of SeaDoo is this by the way.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I'm mechanically inclined, but not to the point of the whole compression tests and what not... I have repaired my cars/trucks over the years, as needed and as complicated as they got, but I haven't messed with engines as much, as far as doing compression tests. I know what the tests are for, but I have never performed one, nor do I have the equipment for testing it... Would a boat shop do it for free you think?

The model jetski is a 1995 Sea Doo Bombardier SPI.
 

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Have you ever checked the plugs after it has shut down to see if you are burning lean or not. Dark, oily plugs are usually means you are burning rich. Whitish gray plugs means you are burning lean. Silver plugs means you have aluminum frags from your piston, not good.

You need a compression guage. it replaces one of the plugs when you crank it over to give high pound reading, then repeat for the other cylinder. I doubt anyone will test it for free, unless you know someone.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hopefully Wal-Mart has the compression gauge. I've seen and used it before, but for something entirely different. I'm going to do it when I get out of class at 2PM.

I did some searching around for a few repair depots in my area, and I talked to a few. One of them was really experienced in Jetski maintenance. He suggested what I have already tried... He first asked if I had tried switching between my primary and auxiliary fuel tanks, and I had, but it didn't improve the situation at the time the engine was dying on the water. So that eliminates the part that controls which tank it pulls fuel from and we can probably safely assume it's working properly (haven't had an issue with it at all, yet). Then he suggested the second easiest diagnostic... Checking out the fuel filter itself. Making sure it's not clogged up. So I'm going to do that as well when I get out of class.

I'll try to keep you guys up to date with my progress, so that ya'll can help me out in the best way possible.

Guys, I know I'm new, but damn, thanks for all of your help.

Zachary.
 
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