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Ya, that's what I thought. She's toast. It will need a full rebuild. The cyl's should be salvageable with just a good cleaning and a touch of scotch Brite and oil. The crank will need be replaced/rebuilt. New Pistons, seals and gaskets. Not a hard job. Just need the manual. And basic hand tools. Only special tools needed wound be torque wrench, feeler gauges, and flywheel puller. The torque wrench and puller can be rented from auto parts store. You'll need to take the coupling off the crank before you break the motor down or have it done by whomever you send the crank to. While the motor is out you can clean the fuel and oil tanks by removing them. Plus the inside of the ski.
Be happy to help you through it if decided to go for it. You'll just need a clean work bench to work from and a place to store cleaned parts.
Do you have a garage/shed to work from?
Try not to turn the motor any more than necessary. Don't want to scratch the cyl at this point. There about $350 to replate one. And should be done in pairs. As a matter of fact put a good dose of 2stroke oil on top of the Pistons to help lube/protect them.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
So been alittle busy with everything going on but I’ve been thinking about if I wanted to do this project and if it would be cost effective but hey why not give it a shot the worst thing to happen is I can’t get it done and sell it right. But now with the quarantine I figure it’s the best time to start pulling parts. Any idea what would be the best bet as to “start here” area for this project? I don’t have a garage but I can bring parts into my basement for storage. And thanks Dave for your help with this.
 

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First if you don't have one, get a service manual. In the general pwc forum there is a manual tab you may find it in there or search ebay. I'd just pull the motor and move into the basement. But before you do set up a nice clean well lit work area. A sheet of plywood on sturdy saw horses will work. Then just slowly dissemble and put all hardware with what it held. Or ziplock bag it with post-it note. Keep a list as you teardown of stuff needing replaced.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Alrighty I will do that, I did print out a manual I found. It looks alittle intimidating but hey why not give it a shot right. With the oil that is in the bottom of the motor is there special stuff that is better than the rest or is it just 2 stroke oil down there?
 

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Wow, she's had water in it for quite awhile then, if the brgs have locked up that tight.

I think those may be original nikasil cyl's. Can you post a pic of the skirts on the bottoms of both cyl's. If there original your way ahead of the game, if they have no scratches. From what I can see though they look great. Being nikasil would explains why their not rusted. Original nikasil cyl's are much preferred over bored and sleeved. The nikasil in a hard chrome directly on the aluminum cyl. It allows for much faster heat removal to the water jacket. Usually with nikasil you just replace the Piston and rings for a topend rebuild if there are no scratches. Where as a steel sleeve holds more heat inside the cyl's. And need rebored when rebuilt. Also a nikasil cyl even if damaged can be replated and repaired.
One thing you need to do before going any further is try to remove the coupling from the pto end of the crank. I can't remember if its left or right hand threaded. You'll have to look closely at any treads showing to see which way to turn it off. Don't force it though. It can be done once removed and most places that sell cranks will remove for you if nessesary.
 
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