Personal Water Craft Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello all,

I'm attempting to replace my oil lines on my 2003 GP1300R but am struggling to get to them. Rookie here - I can usually fumble through YouTube videos and forum posts to get things done, but have spent hours trying/looking and need some help.

Do I have to remove the exhaust to get to the oil pump and replace the lines? Can I remove just the muffler assembly on the starboard/right side of the ski and not the whole thing?

Any advice on removing this thing? Tried watching some videos and still struggling.

Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Hello all,

I'm attempting to replace my oil lines on my 2003 GP1300R but am struggling to get to them. Rookie here - I can usually fumble through YouTube videos and forum posts to get things done, but have spent hours trying/looking and need some help.

Do I have to remove the exhaust to get to the oil pump and replace the lines? Can I remove just the muffler assembly on the starboard/right side of the ski and not the whole thing?

Any advice on removing this thing? I have removed all bolts I can see but it won't budge. Tried watching some videos and still struggling.

Thanks,
Yes, you'll have to remove the exhaust. You may be able to get away only removing the part between the two rubber couplings but I'm betting you probably will have to remove the front portion thats kind of U shaped.
If your using wire ties to connect your oil lines. Be sure to use the BLK ones. They hold up best against the elements and heat. Also I recommend using a wire tie gun to install them. It's the only good way to get the tight and secure. A tie gun can be found in the electrical section of Lowe's, home Depot, or electrical supply house.
Also leave 1/1.5 inches of slack in your hoses to allow for shrinkage. And loosely secure them with wire ties along the route so they don't flop around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the response. So I got it all apart and pulled off the U-shaped exhaust piece you mentioned. I'm pretty sure I found the oil pump, but I don't see any zip ties connecting the oil lines! Everything I've read said Yamaha used zip ties to connect them, right? These look like they're connected normally to the pump.

Looks like the pump can be removed by pulling 2 bolts. I don't want to pull them if everything is fine... it's jammed way down in there and is difficult to get to. Any advice on what I should do?

Thanks again!
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Wow, those are still the factory clamps they started using, I think around 02. My 02 had both, those clamps and ties. My 01 only ties. Either way your setting on a time bomb. No saying how much longer your lines will go.
I recommend replacing them now. And every 2 to 3 years from now on.
If you use a wire tie gun to install the ties and get them good and tight you'll have no issues.
Be sure to bleed the air from the lines after or you'll damage one or all cyl.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Dave! Based on what you said in your post on my other thread, I need to only replace the hoses from the pump to the carb, right? What about the hose from the oil tank to the pump?

What are these clear things attached to the lines - are those the one way valves? Is there any need to do anything with them or are they pretty simple and good to go?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Thanks Dave! Based on what you said in your post on my other thread, I need to only replace the hoses from the pump to the carb, right? What about the hose from the oil tank to the pump?

What are these clear things attached to the lines - are those the one way valves? Is there any need to do anything with them or are they pretty simple and good to go?
Usually the hose from the tank to pump is a different type of hose and stays soft and flexible. You can check it though. If it is stiff and feels hard you may want to replace. If they look oily you may want to at least replace the wire ties.

The white plastic piece in the line is a one way valve to keep the oil from draining back toward the tank. Be careful with them, there about $30ea. Be sure to put them back in correctly. There is a small arrow on them for flow direction. No need to do anything else to them.
Don't remember if I mentioned in previous posts or not. If you remove the cable from the pump it will need to be reset to the timing marks very simple/easy. Will send photo and how to when I get home to manual in a bit. Just a matter of adjusting the cable to line up marks.

This is from the GP800r manual but the mark concept is the same.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Any advice on bleeding the lines? The manual says just to unscrew the air bleed screw 2 full turns and to wait.. I've done that for an extended period of time and no oil is going through the lines. Oil is coming out of the air bleed screw, but not the lines. 2 of the lines I have attached to the carbs, the other one (short one) I have hanging free and pointed towards the bottom of the hull.

Thanks,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
Any advice on bleeding the lines? The manual says just to unscrew the air bleed screw 2 full turns and to wait.. I've done that for an extended period of time and no oil is going through the lines. Oil is coming out of the air bleed screw, but not the lines. 2 of the lines I have attached to the carbs, the other one (short one) I have hanging free and pointed towards the bottom of the hull.

Thanks,
The screw only bleeds the pump and tank line.
Best way I've found is to turn the pump counter clockwise with a drill and 10mm 6 point socket.
It can also be done with the starter in very short cranks. Remove plugs and ground them with them in wires. I also like to add a teaspoon of oil to each cyl before cranking. If done this way.
Or if your fuel tank is low mix it at 40/1 and run it easy to fill lines. Again add a teaspoon of oil to each cyl this way also.
You can also use a large syringe from lawn and garden in Lowe's to push oil through the lines before attaching them at the pump end. Either way you choose to do it with the exception of drill and cranking method. run premix for first few gallons of fuel to cover any missed air bubbles.

I prefer the drill method as all the air is out. no premix needed. And it's as if it were a running system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Thank you! Used the drill method successfully. I'm putting everything back together now.

How critical is the gasket on the exhaust assembly in the attached picture - item #4? As you can see from the photo, my gasket is a little nicked up. Service manual says it isn't reusable, and because I'm anxious to complete this today, I'm just going to use red RTV gasket maker to connect the pieces. Is that ok? How big of a deal is it if there is a slight leak in the exhaust, assuming this doesn't seal perfectly?
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Got everything back together and it won't start. Engine turns over just fine, just won't spark and start. It started just fine after I replaced the solenoid and before I went on this oil line replacement adventure.

Bad gas? It sat for 5 years. But, if it's bad gas, why did it start a few weeks ago before I pulled everything apart to get to the oil lines? Going to siphon out current gas and try again with fresh gas.

Bad spark plugs? Same as above.. Two of the three spark plugs sat out in my garage for about 2 weeks but I felt like I cleaned them off well before putting them back in. Going to get some new ones.

Flooded carbs? When I bled the oil lines, I gave it a few extra turns to make sure some oil got into the carbs before starting it. Did I put too much? Would that prevent it from starting?

I didn't mess with fuel, that I'm aware of.. can pulling the throttle repeatedly while it isn't running flood it w/ gas? I ask because I had some issues putting the throttle cable back in and pulled the throttle repeatedly until I felt comfortable with it. Did this do something?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,547 Posts
That gasket is critical. If it leaks there water will go directly into the motor through the exhaust ports. It needs to be replace with new and be sure both sides of exhaust pipe are clean and flat.

Need three main things for a start on motor. Air, fuel, spark. Need to determine witch one is missing.
If the fuel is that old. yes. Empty and replace. Extra oil in cyl should be fine. Old plugs if they've been fouled and cleaned could be issue too,
Look for any loose wires that may have pulled apart during work. Intentionally or accidentally.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Thanks. Replaced the fuel - won't start. Replaced the plugs - won't start. Have glanced around the engine compartment and can't see anything that looks unusual or disconnected.

Since this is a new topic, I'm going to start a different thread specifically about not starting. Thanks for all your help, Dave.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top