Personal Water Craft Forum banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I'm in the (long) process of considering the purchase of a ski for next summer. I've always loved to ride, but the state of PA effectively closed the rental market a few years ago, and I just don't get out of state and on the water often enough to satisfy.

My fiancee and I are considering buying a Wake Pro 215 (or perhaps it's junior cousin, the Wake 155). Neither of us are hardcore waterskiers or wakeboarders, but we do love us some tubing, and are excited about being able to do tow sports. For me, the interesting point about the Wake models is having the option; It seems logical that they'd ride just as well as a general purpose ski with nothing in tow, and then there's the added option and features for doing tow sports 'by design', instead of ghetto-rigging it. Also I've got to assume the engine is up to the task. (Speaking as someone who blew a piston ring on an old 2-stroke SeaDoo towing a tube ridden by someone a bit big.)

I've seen only a couple threads here about the Wake skis. Do people have any sage advice? Big engine or small? I'm expecting 90% of the use to be on the three rivers of Pittsburgh, PA. Are there any good general resources for people who have experience with two-stroke skis but are new to the modern four-stroke engines?

Thanks in advance for comments.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Go ravens!!!!!!!!!!!!

I'm in the (long) process of considering the purchase of a ski for next summer. I've always loved to ride, but the state of PA effectively closed the rental market a few years ago, and I just don't get out of state and on the water often enough to satisfy.

My fiancee and I are considering buying a Wake Pro 215 (or perhaps it's junior cousin, the Wake 155). Neither of us are hardcore waterskiers or wakeboarders, but we do love us some tubing, and are excited about being able to do tow sports. For me, the interesting point about the Wake models is having the option; It seems logical that they'd ride just as well as a general purpose ski with nothing in tow, and then there's the added option and features for doing tow sports 'by design', instead of ghetto-rigging it. Also I've got to assume the engine is up to the task. (Speaking as someone who blew a piston ring on an old 2-stroke SeaDoo towing a tube ridden by someone a bit big.)

I've seen only a couple threads here about the Wake skis. Do people have any sage advice? Big engine or small? I'm expecting 90% of the use to be on the three rivers of Pittsburgh, PA. Are there any good general resources for people who have experience with two-stroke skis but are new to the modern four-stroke engines?

Thanks in advance for comments.
Hi my name is Bob, I own three Seadoo jet skis. I wouldn't trade them for anything. I have had alot of two strokes mostly Skidoo snowmobiles. Having switched to the 4-tec motors from Seadoo. I love them they start easier, don't smoke and are quieter. I know someone who has the Wake Pro 215, they love it. The closest ski I own is 2009 RXT-IS,255 HP. The IBR controls are second to none finger tip controls. It also the best hull design in the industry called the S-3 stepped hull. The deeper V design and stepped hull combine together to give you a good ride and better performance and handling. I would go for the bigger supercharged engine, simply because I don't like running a motor to hard. With the extra power you don't have to run it wide open. The other good thing about 4-strokes is, no expensive two- stroke oil or being caught without it when getting gas on the water. All of my Seadoos are supercharged with no problems. I even own a 2006 RXT with a high performance RIVA Stage Three kit on it boosting it from 215 HP to approx 300 HP. IMO Sea Doo skis are way ahead of the competition in design features and dealer support. :ShowLetter5:

BTY I hope you are not a Steelers fan. Because my Ravens got their number. LOL:laugh::

I live just south of Philly in Delaware, mostly out on the Chesapeake Bay.:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks for the reply. From what I've been reading the Wake Pro 215 is just an RXT with some accessories and a different paint job, and I've even seen indications that you can add the towing pylon to an RXT with some minimal effort. I've also been coming up to speed reading about some of the common issues with the supercharged 4-tec motors. Have you replaced your supercharger's ceramic washers with steel ones? I've found more than a handful of references indicating that this is something you should do effectively "the day you buy it" but since you own one, I figured I'd ask.

Hey, also, you mention the Chesapeake. Are there any different procedures for dealing with 4-tec engines in salt water? I have "fond" memories of the salt water rinse-out procedures for the cooling path and the even more complex wash-out procedures from the two-stroke days when we'd flood the engine with salt water. I'm hoping at least some of these issues are things of the past, but... say you (temporarily) sink one of these 4-tec skis or flip it the wrong way in salt water... what then?

And yeah, I'm a Steelers fan. How many Superbowl rings do your Ravens have again? One? Oh yeah. That's cool though. :)

Take it easy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Thanks for the reply. From what I've been reading the Wake Pro 215 is just an RXT with some accessories and a different paint job, and I've even seen indications that you can add the towing pylon to an RXT with some minimal effort. I've also been coming up to speed reading about some of the common issues with the supercharged 4-tec motors. Have you replaced your supercharger's ceramic washers with steel ones? I've found more than a handful of references indicating that this is something you should do effectively "the day you buy it" but since you own one, I figured I'd ask.

And yeah, I'm a Steelers fan. How many Superbowl rings do your Ravens have again? One? Oh yeah. That's cool though. :)

Take it easy.
Hey whats up? Yes the Wake Pro 215 is basically an RXT with some accessories, Like programable towing speeds for consistency thru the IBR system, you can add a tow pylon to an RXT. Ok the ceramic washer deal is history on models after 2006. So my 2009 RXT-IS and my 2008 GTX 215 are already stainless steel washers. My 2006 RXT never gave me any trouble when it was a stocker, after I added the RIVA Stage three kit to it for a big performance increase the washers were changed out for stainless steel. Ok what happens if you own a 2006 or older with ceramic washers, nothing until you feel a big power loss then 90% of the washers swap easy. In some cases they can break up, but ceramic is softer then steel so it won't hurt the engine and ends up in a filter on the PTO side of the engine. But that is a mute point since you are looking at new skis. If you are interested in after market performance google RIVA PERFORMANCE. Another good forum is www.greenhulk.com :cheers:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Gah, I asked this in an edit to my previous post, but then noticed you had already replied. I'll ask again for posterity:

You mention the Chesapeake. Are there any different procedures for dealing with 4-tec engines in salt water? I have "fond" memories of the salt water rinse-out procedures for the cooling path and the even more complex wash-out procedures from the two-stroke days when we'd flood the engine with salt water. I'm hoping at least some of these issues are things of the past, but... say you (temporarily) sink one of these 4-tec skis or flip it the wrong way in salt water... what then?

Thanks! I'm feeling better about this already.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
811 Posts
Gah, I asked this in an edit to my previous post, but then noticed you had already replied. I'll ask again for posterity:

You mention the Chesapeake. Are there any different procedures for dealing with 4-tec engines in salt water? I have "fond" memories of the salt water rinse-out procedures for the cooling path and the even more complex wash-out procedures from the two-stroke days when we'd flood the engine with salt water. I'm hoping at least some of these issues are things of the past, but... say you (temporarily) sink one of these 4-tec skis or flip it the wrong way in salt water... what then?

Thanks! I'm feeling better about this already.
You should feel good I'm glad you asked about salt water use. All 4-Tec engines are closed loop cooling with anti freeze. Therefore no saltwater running thru engines. Even other brand jet ski riders agree that Seadoo has a hands down advantage there. and recommend Seadoo. If you some how manage to roll it it all the way over and roll it back the wrong way it would surely depend on how long it was upside down , the longer the worse. Worst case scenario use take it back to the dealer for service. It would be hard to sink one unless there is alot of physical damage but if you do take it to the dealer. Plus for salt water protection they have a nozzle on top of then motor to spray sea lube in to the motor while flushing to coat the engine like a light fogging oil.

In regards to engine superiorty all the ROTAX engines all built in Austria then shipped to Canada for assembly in the ski. Rather than the land of the rising sun. If you look at it the only manufacter that is cutting edge besides Seadoo is Yamaha. Look at who builds the only full line of jet boats, Seadoo and Yamaha. When it comes to jet skis Sea Doo has three things that leaves them wanting are the S-3 stepped hull, the IS suspension, and the IBR finger tip controls.:thumbsup:

Take Care:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
Well, the Wake Pro 215 has the IBR system whereas the Wake 155 does not, which is a big deal. (They both go much faster than anyone really needs to, so power in my view is not an issue - even though my friends with 155's feell power-deprived when I wipe their asses in any kind of race.) Also, the Wake Pro 215 has an amazing "Ski Mode" which let's you start a skier/wakeboarder/kneeboarder with a perfect acceleration and top speed profile every time - no more screwups when starting someone. I myself, however, have had BIG problems with the keys on my Wake Pro 215 being finicky, and we also tipped over on it. (The new S3 stepped hull raises the center of gravity considerably.) So, watch out how your passengers lean when making slow speed turns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I to am also thinking about getting the Wake 155. I am a beginner @ wakeboarding and also own a GTI130SE and love it but from what I have read the extra powerof the 215 is good to have. I also find it hard to find premium fuel on the water some thing that the s/c model requires also the ballast on the 215 puts the WAKE in wakeboarding. Would be nice if someone that owns either one would chime in I am ready to buy mine on Saturday but not sure what one to get or just get another GTI.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
I to am also thinking about getting the Wake 155. I am a beginner @ wakeboarding and also own a GTI130SE and love it but from what I have read the extra powerof the 215 is good to have. I also find it hard to find premium fuel on the water some thing that the s/c model requires also the ballast on the 215 puts the WAKE in wakeboarding. Would be nice if someone that owns either one would chime in I am ready to buy mine on Saturday but not sure what one to get or just get another GTI.
Note that the 2009 Wake Pro 215 had a ballast option, but the 2010 does not, at least not yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
Note that the 2009 Wake Pro 215 had a ballast option, but the 2010 does not, at least not yet.
OH okay so the way they show it is misleading with it having the ballast. Something else to consider if you want to do 360's in the air I am not sure it will be possible behind a jet ski because of the tow line no being up high enough like it is on a wakeboarding boat but again I am a beginner and not 100% sure on that but it seems like it would be hard to do. I want to do this on mine. :laugh:

 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top